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Solomon and Gaenor
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Maureen Lipman as Rezl
Maureen Lipman as Rezl
 
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Maureen Lipman is one of Britain's most renowned actresses, who has worked across a range of theatre, television, and cinema. Her film credits include Up the Junction, Gumshoe, Educating Rita, and Carry on Columbus.

Notable television appearances include the award-winning The Evacuees, written by Jack Rosenthal, Agony, which won her a BAFTA award nomination for best actress, Smiley's People, Couples, Dangerous Davies, The Knowledge, Alan Bennett's Rolling Home, Outside Edge, Lovežs Labour Lost, and many others.

She starred as Beattie in the award-winning BT commercials, and has picked up numerous prizes for her roles in plays and musicals like See How They Run, Wonderful Town, and Lost in Yonkers. She has also made a nationwide tour of her one-woman show Re: Joyce, and has written six books. She is currently playing Aunt Ella in Trevor Nunnžs Oklahoma at the national Theatre.

In SOLOMON & GAENOR she plays the role of Rezl, Solomon's protective mother. 'I wasn't particularly attracted by the character of Rezl. She's another Jewish mother and I've had enough of them to last a lifetime. But I was intrigued by doing a role in another language and Yiddish is such an extraordinary, onomatopoeic language. And I thought that the love story was perennial.'

'My character, Rezl married in Europe and came to Wales. She and her husband run a pawn shop. They try to be respectable but they're regarded with suspicion. They're trying to make a living and keep their dignity and bring up their kids and make no trouble, but there is a strike going on in the valley. There's not enough money to go round and as Jews they're scapegoated. Things are further complicated because her son, Solomon, is rebelling and going out with a non-Jewish girl. Rezl might put love for her son ahead of duty, but what her husband says, goes. We end up with a tragedy.'